Nutrition

A light and nutritous suhoor

Eating healthy in Ramadan

During the Holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims practise daily fasting from dawn until sunset. Traditionally, one breaks the fast at sunset with a meal called iftar and then eats again with a pre-dawn meal called suhoor. There is evidence to suggest that fasting can have positive effects on your health. 

By following simple guidelines, you may be able to lose weight and decrease your blood pressure and cholesterol. Alternatively, over-indulging in iftar or suhoor meals can cause weight gain. Ramadan is often seen as a time to practise self-control, self-discipline, sacrifice and empathy for those less fortunate. It is encouraged to try to maintain these practices even outside of fasting hours.

Read more

News

Sharjah Declaration on Obesity Prevention

30 December 2018 ─ The World Health Organization’s Regional Meeting in Sharjah opened alongside the My Health 7th Regional Conference, organized by the Health Promotion Department of the Supreme Council...

» Read the full story

In focus

During the Holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims practise daily fasting from dawn until sunset. Traditionally, one breaks the fast at sunset with a meal called iftar and then...

» Read the full story

Events

25 April 2017, Islamabad – A joint WHO/Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement Mission visited Pakistan on 10–12 April 2017. The Mission was led by Ms Gerda Verburg SUN Movement Coordinator...

» Read the full story

Statistics and figures

WHO has several nutrition-related global databases. They include data for countries in the Region. Please click on the links to access them.

Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System

WHO Global Database on Body Mass Index

WHO Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition

WHO Global Data Bank on Infant and Young Child Feeding

Some nutrition-related data from the Regional Health Observatory:

Estimates of anaemia in non-pregnant women of reproductive age

Anaemia in preschool-age children

Trend estimates for under 5 child malnutrition: